Democracies at War PDF Download

Are you looking for read ebook online? Search for your book and save it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Download Democracies at War PDF full book. Access full book title Democracies at War by Dan Reiter. Download full books in PDF and EPUB format.

Democracies at War

Democracies at War PDF Author: Dan Reiter
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9780691089492
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages : 302
Book Description
Publisher Description

Democracies at War

Democracies at War PDF Author: Dan Reiter
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9780691089492
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages : 302
Book Description
Publisher Description

Liberal Democracies at War

Liberal Democracies at War PDF Author: Andrew Knapp
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 1441156054
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 265
Book Description
An analysis of.how 20th Century wars have been represented and misrepresented to Western publics.

Liberal Peace, Liberal War

Liberal Peace, Liberal War PDF Author: John Malloy Owen
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801486906
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages : 268
Book Description
Liberal democracies very rarely fight wars against each other, even though they go to war just as often as other types of states do. John M. Owen IV attributes this peculiar restraint to a synergy between liberal ideology and the institutions that exist within these states. Liberal elites identify their interests with those of their counterparts in foreign states, Owen contends. Free discussion and regular competitive elections allow the agitations of the elites in liberal democracies to shape foreign policy, especially during crises, by influencing governmental decision makers. Several previous analysts have offered theories to explain liberal peace, but they have not examined the state. This book explores the chain of events linking peace with democracies. Owen emphasizes that peace is constructed by democratic ideas, and should be understood as a strong tendency built upon historically contingent perceptions and institutions. He tests his theory against ten cases drawn from over a century of U.S. diplomatic history, beginning with the Jay Treaty in 1794 and ending with the Spanish-American War in 1898. A world full of liberal democracies would not necessarily be peaceful. Were illiberal states to disappear, Owen asserts, liberal states would have difficulty identifying one another, and would have less reason to remain at peace.

Democracies at War

Democracies at War PDF Author: Dan Reiter
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400824458
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages : 304
Book Description
Why do democracies win wars? This is a critical question in the study of international relations, as a traditional view--expressed most famously by Alexis de Tocqueville--has been that democracies are inferior in crafting foreign policy and fighting wars. In Democracies at War, the first major study of its kind, Dan Reiter and Allan Stam come to a very different conclusion. Democracies tend to win the wars they fight--specifically, about eighty percent of the time. Complementing their wide-ranging case-study analysis, the authors apply innovative statistical tests and new hypotheses. In unusually clear prose, they pinpoint two reasons for democracies' success at war. First, as elected leaders understand that losing a war can spell domestic political backlash, democracies start only those wars they are likely to win. Secondly, the emphasis on individuality within democratic societies means that their soldiers fight with greater initiative and superior leadership. Surprisingly, Reiter and Stam find that it is neither economic muscle nor bandwagoning between democratic powers that enables democracies to win wars. They also show that, given societal consent, democracies are willing to initiate wars of empire or genocide. On the whole, they find, democracies' dependence on public consent makes for more, rather than less, effective foreign policy. Taking a fresh approach to a question that has long merited such a study, this book yields crucial insights on security policy, the causes of war, and the interplay between domestic politics and international relations.

Never at War

Never at War PDF Author: Spencer R. Weart
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300082982
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages : 436
Book Description
This lively survey of the history of conflict between democracies reveals a remarkable--and tremendously important--finding: fully democratic nations have never made war on other democracies. Furthermore, historian Spencer R. Weart concludes in this thought-provoking book, they probably never will. Building his argument on some forty case studies ranging through history from ancient Athens to Renaissance Italy to modern America, the author analyzes for the first time every instance in which democracies or regimes like democracies have confronted each other with military force. Weart establishes a consistent set of definitions of democracy and other key terms, then draws on an array of international sources to demonstrate the absence of war among states of a particular democratic type. His survey also reveals the new and unexpected finding of a still broader zone of peace among oligarchic republics, even though there are more of such minority-controlled governments than democracies in history. In addition, Weart discovers that peaceful leagues and confederations--the converse of war--endure only when member states are democracies or oligarchies. With the help of related findings in political science, anthropology, and social psychology, the author explores how the political culture of democratic leaders prevents them from warring against others who are recognized as fellow democrats and how certain beliefs and behaviors lead to peace or war. Weart identifies danger points for democracies, and he offers crucial, practical information to help safeguard peace in the future.

The 'Democratic Peace' proposition and democracies using military force

The 'Democratic Peace' proposition and democracies using military force PDF Author: Philipp Schweers
Publisher: GRIN Verlag
ISBN: 3640355105
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages : 12
Book Description
Essay from the year 2009 in the subject Politics - Topic: Peace and Conflict, Security, grade: 8.0, University of Amsterdam, course: International Security, language: English, abstract: The theory of democratic peace is perhaps one of the most widely accepted propositions among international relations scholars today. A vast body of literature, from theoretical elaborations to statistical measurements, concerning liberal peace and/or democratic peace theory has been developed and has explored the proposition profoundly. While it is almost empirically proven that the probability of wars between democratic states is very low or even zero, war is obviously – while having a look on recent or current armed conflicts in which democratic states are engaged – still an option for liberal democracies with regards to disputes with non-democratic states. On a first glance this seems to be paradox. But, while having a deeper look into the scientific discussions, approaches and explanations, it seemingly becomes clear that these two parts – namely the peaceful conflict-resolution between democratic states and democracies’ use of military force – are not conflicting.

A liberal approach - the only explanation for the Democratic Peace Proposition? (ein liberaler Zugang - die einzige Erklärung für den "demokratischen Frieden"?

A liberal approach - the only explanation for the Democratic Peace Proposition? (ein liberaler Zugang - die einzige Erklärung für den Author: Jörg Walter
Publisher: GRIN Verlag
ISBN: 3638399397
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages : 19
Book Description
Seminar paper from the year 2004 in the subject Politics - International Politics - General and Theories, grade: 1,2, Free University of Berlin (Otto-Suhr-Institut), course: HS Demokratie und Frieden, 10 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: In the early 80s political scientists discovered that they overlooked something. Earlier there was an agreement that democracies act as war prone in their foreign policy as non-democracies. The US was fighting in Vietnam; Great Britain in the Falklands and France was fighting in India and Africa, only to name three examples. It was generally assumed that domestic politics had no influence on the foreign policy of a state. Michael Doyle initiated a dramatic change in this point of view in 1983.1 He suggested that there was a huge and important difference between democracies and non-democracies: democracies do not – or very seldom – fight each other. Since this time uncountable numbers of essays were published, which tried to find an answer for this correlation called the DPP – the Democratic Peace Proposition. Most of them take a liberal approach, and today the liberal approach for explaining the DPP is the leading one. Although there are a lot of scientists working in this field, there are still questions, which cannot be answered with a liberal approach. In the first part of my thesis I will introduce the main arguments and aspects of the liberal explanation of the DPP and show in a separate part where this approach failed. Based on these findings I will introduce the (neo)-realistic approach as an alternative explanation for the DPP – particularly the explanation that is represented by Erol Henderson. As well as in the first section I will show at the end the problems and contradictions of this theory. In the last part of my thesis I will bring these two approaches together and try to give an answer to question, if today a (neo) realistic approach – faced by a superior number of liberal explanations – can help to explain the DPP or show aspects of the DPP which can not be analysed by a liberal point of view. I will also give a short overview of research fields which consider if perhaps both theories, the liberal and the realistic one, failed in a context of globaliziation. [...] 1 Hasenclever, Andreas, 2003, Liberale Ansätze zum „demokratischen Frieden“. In: Siegfried Schieder and Manuela Spindler, Theorien der Internationalen Beziehungen, Oppladen, p. 199.

Debating the Democratic Peace

Debating the Democratic Peace PDF Author: Michael E. Brown
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 9780262522137
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages : 420
Book Description
Are democracies less likely to go to war than other kinds of states? This question is of tremendous importance in both academic and policy-making circles and one that has been debated by political scientists for years. The Clinton administration, in particular, has argued that the United States should endeavor to promote democracy around the world. This timely reader includes some of the most influential articles in the debate that have appeared in the journal International Security during the past two years, adding two seminal pieces published elsewhere to make a more balanced and complete collection, suitable for classroom use.

Cultures at War

Cultures at War PDF Author: T. Alexander Smith
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN:
Category : Philosophy
Languages : en
Pages : 302
Book Description
"This book marries rigorous scholarship with riveting examples of morality policy.... The role of values, ethics, and competing moral visions in public policy has long needed treatment of this scope and clarity." - Leslie A. Pal, Carleton University

At War's End

At War's End PDF Author: Roland Paris
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521541978
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages : 306
Book Description
Sample Text