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Late Classical and Early Hellenistic Corinth

Late Classical and Early Hellenistic Corinth PDF Author: Michael D. Dixon
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317676491
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 232
Book Description
Late Classical and Early Hellenistic Corinth, 338-196 B.C. challenges the perception that the Macedonians' advent and continued presence in Corinth amounted to a loss of significance and autonomy. Immediately after Chaironeia, Philip II and his son Alexander III established close relations with Corinth and certain leading citizens on the basis of goodwill (eunoia). Mutual benefits and respect characterized their discourse throughout the remainder of the early Hellenistic period; this was neither a period of domination or decline, nor one in which the Macedonians deprived Corinthians of their autonomy. Instead, Corinth flourished while the Macedonians possessed the city. It was the site of a vast building program, much of which must be construed as the direct result of Macedonian patronage, evidence suggests strongly that those Corinthians who supported the Macedonians enjoyed great prosperity under them. Corinth's strategic location made it an integral part of the Macedonians' strategy to establish and maintain hegemony over the mainland Greek peninsula after Philip II's victory at Chaironeia. The Macedonian dynasts and kings who later possessed Corinth also valued its strategic position, and they regarded it as an essential component in their efforts to claim legitimacy due to its association with the Argead kings, Philip II and Alexander III the Great, and the League of Corinth they established. This study explicates the nature of the relationship between Corinthians and Macedonians that developed in the aftermath of Chaironeia, through the defeat at the battle of Kynoskephalai and the declaration of Greek Freedom at Isthmia in 196 B.C. Late Classical and Early Hellenistic Corinth is not simply the history of a single polis; it draws upon the extant literary, epigraphic, prosopographic, topographic, numismatic, architectural, and archaeological evidence to place Corinth within broader Hellenistic world. This volume, the full first treatment of the city in this period, contributes significantly to the growing body of scholarly literature focusing on the Hellenistic world and is a crucial resource for specialists in late Classical and early Hellenistic history.

Late Classical and Early Hellenistic Corinth

Late Classical and Early Hellenistic Corinth PDF Author: Michael D. Dixon
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317676491
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 232
Book Description
Late Classical and Early Hellenistic Corinth, 338-196 B.C. challenges the perception that the Macedonians' advent and continued presence in Corinth amounted to a loss of significance and autonomy. Immediately after Chaironeia, Philip II and his son Alexander III established close relations with Corinth and certain leading citizens on the basis of goodwill (eunoia). Mutual benefits and respect characterized their discourse throughout the remainder of the early Hellenistic period; this was neither a period of domination or decline, nor one in which the Macedonians deprived Corinthians of their autonomy. Instead, Corinth flourished while the Macedonians possessed the city. It was the site of a vast building program, much of which must be construed as the direct result of Macedonian patronage, evidence suggests strongly that those Corinthians who supported the Macedonians enjoyed great prosperity under them. Corinth's strategic location made it an integral part of the Macedonians' strategy to establish and maintain hegemony over the mainland Greek peninsula after Philip II's victory at Chaironeia. The Macedonian dynasts and kings who later possessed Corinth also valued its strategic position, and they regarded it as an essential component in their efforts to claim legitimacy due to its association with the Argead kings, Philip II and Alexander III the Great, and the League of Corinth they established. This study explicates the nature of the relationship between Corinthians and Macedonians that developed in the aftermath of Chaironeia, through the defeat at the battle of Kynoskephalai and the declaration of Greek Freedom at Isthmia in 196 B.C. Late Classical and Early Hellenistic Corinth is not simply the history of a single polis; it draws upon the extant literary, epigraphic, prosopographic, topographic, numismatic, architectural, and archaeological evidence to place Corinth within broader Hellenistic world. This volume, the full first treatment of the city in this period, contributes significantly to the growing body of scholarly literature focusing on the Hellenistic world and is a crucial resource for specialists in late Classical and early Hellenistic history.

Corinth : results of excavations

Corinth : results of excavations PDF Author: Elizabeth G. Pemberton
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780876610763
Category : Corinth (Greece)
Languages : en
Pages : 38
Book Description


The Regional Production of Red Figure Pottery

The Regional Production of Red Figure Pottery PDF Author: Stine Schierup
Publisher: Aarhus Universitetsforlag
ISBN: 8771243941
Category : Art
Languages : en
Pages : 358
Book Description
In the latter part of the fifth century BC, regional red-figure productions were established outside Attica in regional Greece and in the western Mediterranean, propelled by the impact of the art of Attic vase painting. This collection of papers addresses key issues posed by these production centres. Why did they emerge? To what degree was their inception prompted by the emigration of Attic craftsmen in the context of the weakened Attic pottery market at the onset of the Peloponnesian War? How did Attic vase painting influence already existing traditions, and what was selected, adopted or adapted at the receiving end? Who was using red-figure in mainland Greece and Italy, and what were its particular functions in the local cultures? These and more questions are addressed here with the presentation not only of syntheses, but also primary publication of much newly discovered material. Regional production centres covered include those of Euboea, Boeotia, Corinth, Laconia, Macedonia, Ambracia, Lucania, Apulia, Sicily, Locri and Etruria.

Gnathia and related Hellenistic ware on the East Adriatic coast

Gnathia and related Hellenistic ware on the East Adriatic coast PDF Author: Maja Miše
Publisher: Archaeopress Publishing Ltd
ISBN: 1784911658
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 170
Book Description
This book aims to present Gnathia ware on the East Adriatic coast, to define local Issaean Gnathia production from manufacturing to distribution, to identify other pottery workshops along the East Adriatic coast and, finally, to understand the trade and contacts in the Adriatic during the Hellensitic period.

Late Classical Pottery from Ancient Corinth

Late Classical Pottery from Ancient Corinth PDF Author: Ian McPhee
Publisher: Corinth
ISBN: 9780876610763
Category : Art
Languages : en
Pages : 0
Book Description
In 1971, in the southwestern area of the Roman Forum of Corinth, a round-bottomed drainage channel was discovered filled with the largest deposit of pottery of the 4th century ever found in the city. This book examines the pottery finds, as well as looking at associated items such as coins and metal objects.

Maritime Networks in the Ancient Mediterranean World

Maritime Networks in the Ancient Mediterranean World PDF Author: Justin Leidwanger
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108429947
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 277
Book Description
This book uses network ideas to explore how the sea connected communities across the ancient Mediterranean. We look at the complexity of cultural interaction, and the diverse modes of maritime mobility through which people and objects moved. It will be of interest to Mediterranean specialists, ancient historians, and maritime archaeologists.

Corinth in Late Antiquity

Corinth in Late Antiquity PDF Author: Amelia R. Brown
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1786723581
Category : Religion
Languages : en
Pages : 368
Book Description
Late antique Corinth was on the frontline of the radical political, economic and religious transformations that swept across the Mediterranean world from the second to sixth centuries CE. A strategic merchant city, it became a hugely important metropolis in Roman Greece and, later, a key focal point for early Christianity. In late antiquity, Corinthians recognised new Christian authorities; adopted novel rites of civic celebration and decoration; and destroyed, rebuilt and added to the city's ancient landscape and monuments. Drawing on evidence from ancient literary sources, extensive archaeological excavations and historical records, Amelia Brown here surveys this period of urban transformation, from the old Agora and temples to new churches and fortifications. Influenced by the methodological advances of urban studies, Brown demonstrates the many ways Corinthians responded to internal and external pressures by building, demolishing and repurposing urban public space, thus transforming Corinthian society, civic identity and urban infrastructure. In a departure from isolated textual and archaeological studies, she connects this process to broader changes in metropolitan life, contributing to the present understanding of urban experience in the late antique Mediterranean.

Houses of Ill Repute

Houses of Ill Repute PDF Author: Allison Glazebrook
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812292693
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 264
Book Description
The study of ancient Greek urbanism has moved from examining the evidence for town planning and the organization of the city-state, or polis, to considerations of "everyday life." That is, it has moved from studying the public (fortifications, marketplaces, council houses, gymnasiums, temples, theaters, fountain houses) to studying the private (the physical remains of Greek houses). But what of those buildings that housed activities neither public nor private—brothels, taverns, and other homes of illicit activity? Can they be distinguished from houses? Were businesses like these run from homes? Classical Athenian writers attest to a diverse urban landscape that included tenement houses (sunoikiai), inns (diaitai, pandokeia), factories (ergasteria), taverns (kapelia), gambling dens (skirapheia), training schools (didaskaleia), and brothels (porneia), yet, despite our knowledge of specific terms, associating them with actual physical remains has not been easy. One such writer, Isaeus, mentions tenement houses that hosted prostitutes and wine sellers, while his contemporary Aeschines refers to doctors, smiths, fullers, carpenters, and pimps renting space. Were tenement houses not simply multi-inhabitant spaces but also multipurpose ones? Houses of Ill Repute is the first book to focus on the difficulties of distinguishing private and semiprivate spaces. While others have studied houses or brothels, this volume looks at both together. The chapters, by leading scholars in the field, address such questions as "What is a house?" and "Did the business of prostitution leave behind a unique archaeological record?" Presenting several approaches to identifying and studying distinctions between domestic residences and houses of ill repute, and drawing on the fields of literature, history, and art history and theory, the volume's contributors provide a way forward for the study of domestic and entertainment spaces in the Hellenic world. Contributors: Bradley A. Ault, Allison Glazebrook, Mark L. Lawall, Kathleen M. Lynch, David Scahill, Amy C. Smith, Monika Trümper, Barbara Tsakirgis.

The Architecture of the Ancient Greek Theatre

The Architecture of the Ancient Greek Theatre PDF Author: Rune Frederiksen
Publisher: Aarhus Universitetsforlag
ISBN: 8771249966
Category : Architecture
Languages : en
Pages : 468
Book Description
This book is a collection of papers following the conference The Architecture of the Ancient Greek Theatre, held in Athens in January 2012. Fundamental publications on the topic have not been issued for many years. Bringing together the leading experts on theatre architecture, this conference aimed at introducing new facts and important comprehensive studies on Greek theatres to the public. The published volume is, first of all, a presentation of new excavation results and new analyses of individual monuments. Many well-known theatres such as the one of Dionysos in Athens, and others at Dodone, Corinth, and Sikyon have been re-examined since their original publication, with stunning results. New research, presented in this volume, includes moreover less well known, or even newly found, ancient Greek theatres in Albania, Asia Minor, Cyprus, and Sicily. Further studies on the history of research, on regional theatrical developments, terminology, and function, as well as a perspective on Roman theatres built in Greek traditions make this volume a comprehensive volume of new research for expert scholars as well as for students and the interested public.

Roman Amphora Contents: Reflecting on the Maritime Trade of Foodstuffs in Antiquity (In honour of Miguel Beltrán Lloris)

Roman Amphora Contents: Reflecting on the Maritime Trade of Foodstuffs in Antiquity (In honour of Miguel Beltrán Lloris) PDF Author: Darío Bernal-Casasola
Publisher: Archaeopress Publishing Ltd
ISBN: 1803270632
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 512
Book Description
Presents the results of the RACIIC International Congress (Roman Amphora Contents International Interactive Conference, Cádiz, 2015), dedicated to the distinguished Spanish amphorologist Miguel Beltrán Lloris. This volume aims to reflect on the current state of knowledge about the palaeocontents of Roman amphorae.